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Barry Bonds
Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is a Major League left fielder for the San Francisco Giants. He is the son of former MLB All-Star Bobby Bonds and the godson of Hall of Famer Willie Mays.

Bonds holds a number of Major League Baseball records including the most home runs in a single season set in 2001 with 73.

Through 2006, Bonds is first in career walks (2,426) and intentional walks (645). He is 2nd in career home runs with 734, trailing only Hank Aaron who hit 755; Bonds also ranks 2nd in extra base hits (1,398), 3rd in at bats per home run (13.0), 6th in on-base percentage (.443), runs (2,152), slugging percentage (.608), and total bases (5,784), and 7th in RBIs (1,930). Bonds also tops the list of career home runs in the National League, having eclipsed Aaron's previous record of 733.

Through 2006 he also leads all active players in home runs, RBIs (1,930), walks (2,426), intentional walks (645), obp (.443), runs (2,152), games (2,860), extra base hits (1,398), at bats per home run (13.0), and total bases (5,784). At the same time he is 2nd in doubles (587), slugging percentage (.608), and stolen bases (509), 3rd in at bats (9,507) and hits (2,841), 4th in triples (77), and 8th in strikeouts (1,485).

Bonds has been compared with some of baseball's best hitters of all time, including legends Ted Williams, Babe Ruth, Rogers Hornsby, and Ty Cobb.

Since 2003, Bonds has become a key figure in the BALCO scandal and despite the fact that Bonds has never failed a drug test, a number of journalists have alleged that Bonds used steroids as well as other performance-enhancing substances. To date, Bonds has not been charged with any crime in connection with the BALCO incident, and has never failed a test for performance-enhancing drugs. Furthermore, the steroids he is accused of taking were not outlawed by MLB at the time he allegedly took them. However, some steroids he has been accused to have taken are illegal in the United States without proper prescription.

He began his major league career in 1986 with the Pittsburgh Pirates, who selected him with the 6th overall pick in the 1985 draft. Bonds played with the Prince William Pirates for the 1985 season (with Bobby Bonilla) and, during the last game of the season, played all 9 positions.

In 1986, Bonds finished 6th in Rookie of the Year voting, hitting 16 home runs and stealing 36 bases. Over the next 3 years, he was criticized for not living up to his potential, despite having respectable numbers. He hit 25 home runs in his sophomore season along with 32 stolen bases and 59 RBIs. Bonds improved in 1988, hitting .283 with 24 home runs, the latter being among the league leaders. Bonds started off his 1989 campaign well, but petered off quickly. He finished with just 19 homers and 58 RBIs.

However, 1990 proved to be a different story. Bonds won the MVP award for the first time, hitting .301 with 33 home runs and 114 RBI. His 52 stolen bases was third in the league. He won his first Gold Glove and Silver Slugger Awards. In 1991, Bonds also put up great numbers, hitting 25 homers and driving in 116 runs, and obtained another Gold Glove and Silver Slugger. Despite this, he finished second to NL batting champion Terry Pendleton in the MVP voting. The next season, Bonds won his second MVP award. He dominated the NL, hitting .311 with 34 homers and 103 RBIs. Bonds helped the Pirates into the playoffs, and figured in the final play in Game 7 of the NLCS, where he tried to throw out Sid Bream in order to keep the game going. But the throw to catcher Mike LaValliere's was late. For the second time in three seasons, the Pirates were denied a trip to the World Series.

In 1993, Bonds left the Pirates to sign a lucrative free agent contract worth a then-record $43.75 million over 6 years with the Giants, with whom his father spent the first 7 years of his career. That season, Bonds hit .336, and led the league with 46 home runs and 123 RBI. Unfortunately, as good as the Giants were, winning 103 games, the Braves were 1 game better.

In 1994, at the strike, Bonds was on a tear, hitting .312 with 37 home runs, was leading the league in walks. In 1995 Bonds hit 33 homers and drove in 104 runners, along with a .294 batting average, but he finished 12th in the MVP voting.

In 1996, Bonds became the first National League player to hit 40 home runs and steal 40 bases in the same season. He also drove in 129 runs with a .308 average, and walked a then-National League record 151 times. During the season, he also joined the very exclusive 300 homer/300 stolen base club, with fellow members Willie Mays, Andre Dawson, and his own father, Bobby Bonds. In 1997, Bonds hit .291, his lowest number since 1989, but his other numbers were very impressive. He hit 40 home runs for the second straight year and drove in 101 runs. That year he led the league in walks again with 145, just 6 off his NL record of a year before. He tied his father in 1997 for having the most 30/30 seasons.

In 1998, Bonds got off to a very rocky start, and some were starting to wonder if Barry was beginning to age. By season's end however, he put those notions to rest. He hit .303 with 37 home runs and drove in 122 runs, winning his 8th Gold Glove, and became the first player ever to have 400 home runs and 400 stolen bases. Yet, he placed 8th in the MVP voting, likely due to baseball's home run fever in 1998, led by the McGwire/Sosa home run chase.

Throughout the decade of the 1990s, Bonds was an exceptionally patient hitter and a great slugger who stole bases and played Gold Glove defense. Bill James ranked Bonds as the best player of the 1990s, noting that his selection for the 1990s' 2nd-best player (Craig Biggio) had been closer in production to the decade's 10th-best player than he was to Bonds.

On February 19, 2006, Bonds announced in an interview with USA Today that he planned on retiring at the conclusion of the 2006 season, with or without the all-time home run record. "I've never cared about records anyway", he said, "so what difference does it make? Right now, I'm telling you, I don't even want to play next year. Baseball is a fun sport. But I'm not having fun...I love the game of baseball itself, but I don't like what it's turned out to be. I'm not mad at anybody. It's just that right now I am not proud to be a baseball player."

On March 9, 2006, after his first game of the preseason with the San Francisco Giants, Bonds said that he would know around the All-Star Break and in a time period ranging from July to August 2006, whether or not he would be returning for the 2007 MLB season.

Bonds started the 2006 season with a slump. Bonds hit under .200 for his first 10 games of the season. Bonds didn't hit a home run until April 22; it was his biggest home run slump since the 1998 season. Throughout May, June, July, and early August, Bonds continued with sub-par offensive performance, although as his chronic injuries began to bother him less and less as the season went on, his defensive performance improved. In August, he made several running and leaping catches of a sort that had become rare for him during recent seasons.

Then, in late August, Bonds began an offensive surge, hitting 10 home runs in 25 starts from August 21 through September 23, and lifting his batting average 40 points in the same stretch. On August 20 Bonds' batting average fell to .235, his lowest average since early May. From then to September 23, Bonds could look back to a full month on an offensive tear: a .400 batting average (34 hits in 85 official at-bats), a .800 slugging percentage, with 10 home runs, 6 doubles and 26 runs batted in, along with 19 walks and only 8 strikeouts. Although media talk about the unlikelihood of Bonds' being re-signed by the Giants for the 2007 season had grown through the season and into August, the tenor of speculation abruptly turned around with many commentators concluding that it would be difficult to ignore the late-season contribution by Bonds that was keeping the Giants in the pennant race.

In 2006, Bonds recorded his lowest slugging percentage (a statistic that he has historically ranked among league leaders season after season) since 1991 with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

In a 2005 interview with MLB.com, Bonds stated that he could play into 2007 if he remains healthy and if he is close to Aaron's 755 home runs, although he also noted that he might retire before then if he is able to win a World Series title. Bonds' current total, as of the end of the 2006 MLB season, is 734. With his 733rd and 734th career home runs, hit respectively on September 22 and 23, 2006, Bonds tied and then passed Henry Aaron's National League career record in Milwaukee, the city where Aaron's career began and ended.

In early December the Giants announced they had signed Bonds to a 1 year, $16 million contract.

In 1998, Bonds tied John Olerud for the National League record of 15 consecutive plate appearances reaching base. He tied this record again in 2003.
In 2001, Bonds's slugging percentage of (.863) set a single-season record. He also slugged .812 in 2004, only the second time in history that a player has bettered .800 twice (Babe Ruth was the other, with .847 in 1920 and .846 in 1921, respectively).
In 2002, Bonds amassed a .582 on-base percentage, breaking Ted Williams' 1941 record of .551. In 2004, Bonds finished with a .609 OBP, the only time a player has bettered .600 over a full season.
In 2002, Bonds won the National League batting title with a .370 average, becoming the oldest player to win the honor for the first time. In 2004, he won his second batting title with a .362 average.
During the 2002 post-season, Bonds set the record for most home runs hit in a single post-season (8). Bonds hit .471 with 4 home runs and 13 walks (seven intentional) in the World Series, thereby slugging 1.294 with a .700 on-base percentage. All but the batting average were World Series records.
In 2004, Bonds set the single-season OPS record with a total of 1.422.
In 2004, Bonds became the first player in history with more times on base (376) than official times at bat (373). This was due to the record number of walks, which count as a time on base but not a time at bat. He had 135 hits, 232 walks, and 9 hit-by-pitches for the 376 number.
Bonds has won the National League Player of the Month award thirteen times which is a record for either league. The next highest in either league is Frank Thomas who won the A.L. award eight times and the next highest total in the N.L. is only six held by George Foster, Pete Rose and Dale Murphy.
Bonds has the most trading cards issued of him than any other athlete in the world. According to an October 31 search on Beckett Online, the site catalogued 10,306 cards.

On May 7, 2006, Bonds drew within one home run of tying Babe Ruth for second place, hitting his 713th career home run into the second level of Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, off pitcher Jon Lieber in an ESPN nationally-televised game in which the Giants lost to the Philadelphia Phillies. The towering home run, which was one of the longest in Citizens Bank Park's two season history, traveling an estimated 450 feet, hit off the facade of the third deck in right field and was Bonds' first pulled home run of the 2006 season. Curiously, and perhaps revealingly, the jeers from the Philadelphia crowd that had haunted Bonds earlier that night turned noticeably into cheers as he completed his swing, watched the flight of the ball, rounded the bases, and touched home plate, all this to flashbulbs exploding everywhere throughout the stands. The mixed and often paradoxical reaction to Bonds' impending achievement exemplifies the polarizing effect of his controversial career on baseball aficionados and casual observers alike. Some have ventured to say that while many fans hate Bonds, they all come to the park to see him play.

On May 9, 2006 in a game against the Chicago Cubs, Bonds hit what appeared to be his 714th home run. However, Cubs outfielder Juan Pierre leaped up at the wall and prevented him from tying Ruth's record.

On May 20, 2006, Bonds tied Ruth, hitting his 714th career home run to deep right field to lead off the top of the 2nd inning with a 1-1 count. The home run came off of left handed pitcher Brad Halsey of the Oakland A's, in an interleague game played in Oakland, California at the McAfee Coliseum (formerly known as the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum or the Oakland Coliseum). Since this was an interleague game at an American League stadium, Bonds was batting as the designated hitter in the cleanup spot in the lineup for the Giants. The Bambino's 714 mark was tied by Bonds who hits left handed, the pitcher Halsey pitches left handed, and the fan who caught it, Tyler Snyder is left handed; all this to tie arguably the best left handed hitter in history. Echoing the comment Aaron made when he reached the 715 mark 32 years earlier. However, like Aaron, Bonds needed more at bats to break the record. Bonds was quoted after the game as being "just glad it's over with" and stated that more attention could be focused on Albert Pujols, the heir apparent to Bonds. Bonds went 1 for 3 with 2 walks, a run and an RBI for the day in a 4-2 victory over the Athletics as designated hitter batting cleanup.

On May 28, 2006, Bonds passed Ruth, hitting his 715th career home run to center field off of Colorado Rockies pitcher Byung-Hyun Kim. It came on a 3-2 pitch, with one man on base, in the bottom of the fourth inning of the final game of a home stand at AT&T Park. The ball was hit an estimated 445 feet into center field where it went through the hands of several fans but then fell onto an elevated platform in center field. Then it rolled off the platform where Andrew Morbitzer, a 38-year-old San Francisco resident, caught the ball while he was in line at a concession stand. Mysteriously, broadcaster Dave Flemming's radio play-by-play of the home run went silent just as the ball was hit, apparently from a microphone failure. But the televised version, called by Duane Kuiper, was not affected. This historic home run was not officially celebrated by MLB; however, the Giants organization unfurled two large banners from light standards alongside the scoreboard in center field to honor the event. And as Bonds took his position in left field at the top of the fifth inning, Ed Montague, the long-time National League and MLB umpire and crew chief who was officiating at second base for this game, approached Bonds to congratulate him, and the two hugged. Bonds went 2 for 3 with a walk, run scored and two RBI for the day in a 6-3 loss to the Rockies while batting cleanup and playing left field.

On September 22, 2006, Bonds tied Henry Aaron's National League career home run record of 733. The home run came in the top of the 6th inning of a high-scoring game against the Milwaukee Brewers, at Miller Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The achievement was notable for its occurrence in the very city where Aaron began (with the Milwaukee Braves) and concluded (with the Brewers, then in the American League) his career. With the Giants trailing 10-8, Bonds hit a blast to deep center field on a 2-0 pitch off of the Brewers' Chris Spurling with runners on first and second and one out. Though the Giants were at the time clinging to only a faint chance at making the playoffs, Bonds' home run provided the additional drama of giving the Giants an 11-10 lead late in a critical game in the final days of a pennant race. The Brewers eventually won the game, 13-12, despite Bonds' going 3 for 5, with 2 doubles, the record-tying home run, and 6 runs batted in.

On the following day, September 23, 2006, Bonds went past Aaron for the NL career home run record. Hit in Milwaukee like the previous one, this was a solo home run off Chris Capuano of the Brewers, and it came on a 1-0 count with 1 out in the 3rd inning of the game. This was his last home run hit in 2006.

Holds record for most home runs in a season (73)
2nd all time for career home runs (734)
Holds record for most walks in a career (2,424)
Holds record for most MVP awards (7) and consecutive MVP awards (4); (1990, 1992-93, 2001-04)
Holds record for consecutive games with a walk (18)
Shares record for consecutive plate appearances with a walk (7)
Holds record for consecutive seasons with 30 or more home runs (13)
Holds record for consecutive seasons with .600 slugging percentage or higher (8)
5-time SF Giants Player of the Year (1998, 2001-04)
13-Time All-Star (1990, 1992-98, 2000-04)
7-Time Baseball America NL All-Star OF (1993, 1998, 2000-04)
3-Time Major League Player of the Year (1990, 2001, 2004)
3-Time Baseball America MLB Player of the Year (2001, 2003-04)
8-Time Gold Glove winner for NL Outfielder (1990-94, 1996-98)
12-Time Silver Slugger winner for NL Outfielder (1990-94, 1996-97, 2000-04)
Led the Major Leagues in home runs (1993, 2001)
Led the NL in batting average (2002, 2004)
Led the NL in on base percentage (1991-93, 1995, 2001-04, 2006)
Led the Major Leagues in slugging percentage (1990, 1992-93, 2001-04)
Led the Major Leagues in extra base hits (1992-93, 2001)
Led the Major Leagues in on base percentage (1992, 2001-04)
Led the NL in runs (1992)
Led the NL in RBIs (1993)
Led the NL in walks (1992, 1994-97, 2000-04, 2006)
Led the NL in intentional walks (1992-98, 2002-04, 2006)
Led the NL in runs created (1992-93, 2001-02, 2004)
Led the Major Leagues in total bases (1993, with 365)
Led the Major Leagues in runs created (1993, 2001-02, 2004)
Led the NL in games (1995)
Led the NL in extra base hits (1992-93, 2001)
Led the NL in at bats per home run (1992-93, 1996, 2000-04)
3-Time NL Hank Aaron Award winner (2001-02, 2004)
Led the Major Leagues in batting average (2002, with .370)
Listed at # 6 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, the highest-ranked active player, in 2005.
Named a finalist to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999, but not elected to the team in the fan balloting.
Rating of 345 on Baseball-Reference.com's Hall of Fame monitor (100 is a good HOF candidate); 9th among all hitters, highest among hitters not in HOF yet.

Year Ag Tm Lg G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG TB SH SF IBB HBP GDP
+---+--+---+--++---++---+---+---+--+--+--+---+--+--+---+---+----+----+----+---+--+--+---+---+---+
1986 22 PIT NL 113 413 72 92 26 3 16 48 36 7 65 102 .223 .330 .416 172 2 2 2 2 4
1987 23 PIT NL 150 551 99 144 34 9 25 59 32 10 54 88 .261 .329 .492 271 0 3 3 3 4
1988 24 PIT NL 144 538 97 152 30 5 24 58 17 11 72 82 .283 .368 .491 264 0 2 14 2 3
1989 25 PIT NL 159 580 96 144 34 6 19 58 32 10 93 93 .248 .351 .426 247 1 4 22 1 9
1990 26 PIT NL 151 519 104 156 32 3 33 114 52 13 93 83 .301 .406 .565 293 0 6 15 3 8
1991 27 PIT NL 153 510 95 149 28 5 25 116 43 13 107 73 .292 .410 .514 262 0 13 25 4 8
1992 28 PIT NL 140 473 109 147 36 5 34 103 39 8 127 69 .311 .456 .624 295 0 7 32 5 9
1993 29 SFG NL 159 539 129 181 38 4 46*123 29 12 126 79 .336 .458 .677 365 0 7 43 2 11
1994 30 SFG NL 112 391 89 122 18 1 37 81 29 9 74 43 .312 .426 .647 253 0 3 18 6 3
1995 31 SFG NL 144 506 109 149 30 7 33 104 31 10 120 83 .294 .431 .577 292 0 4 22 5 12
1996 32 SFG NL 158 517 122 159 27 3 42 129 40 7 151 76 .308 .461 .615 318 0 6 30 1 11
1997 33 SFG NL 159 532 123 155 26 5 40 101 37 8 145 87 .291 .446 .585 311 0 5 34 8 13
1998 34 SFG NL 156 552 120 167 44 7 37 122 28 12 130 92 .303 .438 .609 336 1 6 29 8 15
1999 35 SFG NL 102 355 91 93 20 2 34 83 15 2 73 62 .262 .389 .617 219 0 3 9 3 6
2000 36 SFG NL 143 480 129 147 28 4 49 106 11 3 117 77 .306 .440 .688 330 0 7 22 3 6
2001 37 SFG NL 153 476 129 156 32 2 73*137 13 3 177 93 .328 .515 .863*411 0 2 35 9 5
2002 38 SFG NL 143 403 117 149 31 2 46 110 9 2 198 47 .370 .582 .799 322 0 2 68 9 4
2003 39 SFG NL 130 390 111 133 22 1 45 90 7 0 148 58 .341 .529 .749 292 0 2 61 10 7
2004 40 SFG NL 147 373 129 135 27 3 45 101 6 1 232* 41 .362 .609 .812 303 0 3 120 9 5
2005 41 SFG NL 14 42 8 12 1 0 5 10 0 0 9 6 .286 .404 .667 28 0 1 3 0 0
2006 42 SFG NL 130 367 74 99 23 0 26 77 3 0 115 51 .270 .454 .545 200 0 1 38 10 9


 

 

 

 

 

 


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